Yay for Microsoft and Boo for Yahoo!

Huffington Post posted an interesting item in their Tech blog on November 13. Read it here and then come back and talk. We’ll wait.

After years of grading employees on a Bell Curve and dumping those at the bottom, Microsoft figured out that they were destroying collaboration, trust and teamwork. High performers didn’t want to be on the same team as other high performers, because they would be graded against them.

I am amazed that a company as “smart” as Microsoft would ever fall for such a concept, but I’m delighted that they are dumping it now.

And now Yahoo! starts it up:

“CEO Marissa Mayer had recently begun implementing this exact strategy at Yahoo. AllThingsD’s Kara Swisher reported that Mayer asked managers to rank their workers on a curve, and more than 600 people have been fired in the past few weeks.”

Nothing says caring, justice and employee engagement like grading people on a curve.

Employees are not “assets”. They are people. Giving people opportunity for advancement is one of the top things they crave in work. Helping people improve and adjust is hard work, though, so some companies, whose CEOs are so far removed from real work that their people become numbers, opt for the easy grading system – and they let other people do the firing too, I’m sure.

Employee engagement is real, hard work, and it can be fun, too. It’s easily the best way to create an atmosphere where collaboration, trust and excellence bloom.

If you’re not sure how to get there, talk to me. I know how to get it started, and I know people who can help.

Patrick Short is currently re-learning the art of middle management as music director in the da Vinci Arts Middle School production of I Ain’t Got No Home, written and directed by his wife, Ruth Jenkins. This week, he taught a workshop for Siren Nation. Next week, he’ll work with an architecture firm on integrating their 18 new employees into the firm of 44 people.

 

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